Tempestuous

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We’ve got a schoolboy moral dilemma to tackle, from somebody who, for his own good, had better remain nameless:

I have a confession to make.

This child – shall we call him “Fred” – he had his book of The Tempest which our teacher says we are required to bring every lesson on pain of detention, sadly I had forgotten mine.

So this boy “Fred” left his bag unattended with his copy of The Tempest in it; so I ripped it out of his bag and rubbed out his name, then I put mine in.

He returned and whilst looking through his bag he panicked and said he couldn’t find it. He received a detention and the teacher told him he needed to bring it or he would get another detention.

I felt as if I could not just laugh it off and say sorry then take the hit and get into major trouble, so I went home with the copy.

The next day our teacher told us that they were dealing with a theft and if anyone got caught with the book they would have detention for the rest of the week and the following week, so on the way home I threw his copy of The Tempest into someone’s garden.

Should I keep this as a dark secret, never to be revealed to anyone but AMT? Or do you think I will get caught as it is just a matter of time before they piece it together, as they have CCTV in our classrooms?

The Tempest is categorised amongst Shakespeare’s ‘problem plays’, so it is little wonder that his epic problem has raised some questions of my own, namely:

1. What did Fred do to deserve this?
2. Depending upon the smallness of your hometown and the astuteness of the mystery garden owner, won’t the retrieval of a copy of The Tempest with your name written inside be fairly incriminating?
3. Why didn’t you just sneak it back into his bag at the end of the first day?
4. I know that schoolbook loss/theft isn’t to be encouraged, but isn’t your teacher rather overreacting? Or is your school actually run like a police state? I can’t believe your teachers would in reality be planning to frisk everybody for contraband copies of The Tempest. I also can’t quite believe your classrooms have CCTV, and that it would really be worth the school’s while, for the price of an out-of-copyright book, to plough through the footage.
5. Is it just me, or is The Tempest (whisper it) a bit rubbish?

Readers, I can’t raise a great deal of sympathy for this young fool, so please do my job for me and head for the comments to offer your advice for him. I worry that if we leave him to deal with it on his own, the situation will escalate to the point where he has to kill every member of his school and burn all books to cover his tracks.

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6 Responses to “Tempestuous”

  1. Fred Says:

    I am in communication with both Fred and the crim in question. This topic is incredible to an epic extent.

  2. Saint Sam Says:

    You could have put the book inside someone else’s bag, thus widening the circle of destruction you have wrought upon your peers.
    But, as what is done is done, I would just go on living my life.

    In future, try to reserve your villainous expoits for half decent scripts (I reccommend Asylum by Paul Kember – a good steal).

  3. Jack Says:

    why do your classrooms have cctv? that seems a bit odd….

  4. V Says:

    I like the above suggestion if you can get another copy, maybe put it on his desk/locker with a small chocolate bar as an offering. If that’s not possible then own up, explain you panicked and take the punishment. Although it feels like the end of the world one day you will look back and laugh, the worst they can do is give you detentions and tell your parents, you won’t get a prison term! Just try and get across how you panicked and how sorry you are

  5. mrg Says:

    the fact that the school know it is a theft suggests that they know who did it already but are giving the perpetrator a chance to own up as a test of character.

    however, given the despicable nature of this trilogy of heinous acts – theft, condemning a classmate to detention, and obstructing the course of justice – it’s best that they don’t own up, in order that the eventual punishment is more commensurate with the crime(s).

  6. nickjdavies Says:

    buy a new copy, leave it on his desk, say nothing, move on

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